Perry Township author publishes book on dialysis

Retired journalist Bernie Gilmer holds his new book, Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS. *Submitted photo

Due to an early shipment, a new book by Indianapolis (Perry Township) author and retired journalist Bernie Gilmer, titled Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS, is available for public purchase sooner than expected.

The paperback release features the personal account of the author’s seven-month experience on dialysis that is backgrounded by a decade-long journey in reaching the final stage of kidney disease. The author since February 1 has been undergoing treatments three times a week at the Premier Dialysis center on the Indianapolis south side.

The 16-chapter, 174-page documentation also contains information on the growth of the multi-billion-dollar dialysis industry in the United States since its inception in the early 1940s. Passages also address topical issues such as: pertaining to whether patients who quit dialysis or refuse treatment are committing suicide, and whether those who are entering dialysis consider the new lifestyle as an albatross or as a blessing.

One chapter contains the prospects for hope for those on dialysis and for those with kidney transplants. Another chapter chronicles athletes who have received kidney implantations. And another chapter combines perhaps some humor with definite suffering during the author’s encounters with the side effect of one of his medications, accounts that should not be told at the dinner table.

Dr. Charlotte Templin, a retired English professor and former department head at the University of Indianapolis, provided the “Foreward” for this new book.

“Bernie Gilmer’s account of the journey through kidney disease to the threshold of dialysis and beyond that momentous point of embarkation,” according to Dr. Templin, “provides inspiration and entertainment as well as an abundance of valuable information on all things pertaining to kidneys. As such, the book will be very useful to the individual facing dialysis, patients’ families, and all those who want to know more about the kidney, that “large ugly mystery,” as Joseph Heller terms it in his comic novel Catch-22. Gilmer follows the familiar suggestion about what to do with lemons, and what he serves up is refreshing in spite of the seriousness of the subject.”

Initial book distribution is being handled by the DIO DI-AL-Y-SIS Company, owned and managed by the author. Promotion is being marketed online at www.diodialysis.com, and the book also is available on Amazon.com.