09.01.11 Obits

August 31, 2011 in Obituaries by Submission For The Southside Times

Arlene Bridgford, 78, Indianapolis,
died Aug. 26, 2011.
She was born Dec. 28, 1932
in Seattle, Wash. to the late
Glenn and Cecil (Doty) Parker.
Survivors include her children,
Harvey (Beth) Bridgford
of Craig, AK, LaChrista
(Mark) Klosterkemper of
Greensburg, Tandy (Mark)
Lewis of Stephenville, TX,
Whitney (Shaune) Bridgford
of St. Paul and Tracie (David)
Wilson of Indianapolis;
grandchildren, Derik, Kassandra,
Wesley, Tristan, Skyler,
Jarrad, Eric, Randi, David,
Amber and Trent. She
was preceded in death by
a granddaughter, Andrea;
four brothers, and three sisters.
Services were held Aug.
31 at Wilson St. Pierre Funeral
Service and Crematory,
Stirling-Gerber Chapel, with
burial at Acton Cemetery.
Helen Mae Lambert Burtnett,
89, died in Rockledge,
Fla. on Aug. 23, 2011. She
was born to the late John
Albert and Olive Mae (Bush)
Lambert and was raised in
Beech Grove. She met her
late husband, Paul Everett
Burtnett, in 1945 while attending
USO dances sponsored
for troops at the Indiana
Roof Ball Room. They
married on May 11, 1946,
when he returned from The
Battle of the Bulge. She was
employed by Eli Lilly until
1947. She was a member
of Northminster Presbyterian
and Eastern Star. She
was a past board of directors’
member of the Riviera
Club. She retired in 1988.
moving from Indianapolis
to Ft. Myers, Fla. Survivors
include three children: Earl
(Diana) Burtnett and John
(Judy) Burtnett both of New
Palestine, and Linda (Gerald)
Basler of Rockledge, Fl;
11 grandchildren and 18
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
a son, Ralph Everett Burtnett;
brothers, Donald, Harold
and Earl Lambert; and
two infant siblings. Funeral
services were held Aug. 27
at Little and Sons Funeral
Home, Beech Grove Chapel,
with burial at New Palestine
Cemetery in New Palestine.
Deaven Storm Deel,
Indianapolis, died Aug. 26, 2011.
He was born April 13, 2010.
His parents are William Deel
and Krista Forey. Other survivors
include three brothers,
Christopher, Justus, and
Tristan Deel; grandparents,
Kathy Deel, Janna Franklin
(Rocky), and David and
Edith Forey; and an uncle,
Dustin Deel. He was preceded
in death by a grandfather,
William Deel and an
uncle, Derrick Deel. A service
will be conducted at
2:30 p.m., Sept. 3, 2011 at
Wilson St. Pierre Funeral Service
& Crematory, Southport
Chapel, 7520 Madison Ave.
Friends may call from 1:30
p.m. until the service. Burial
follows at Young’s Creek
Cemetery. Memorial contributions
may be made to
Deaven’s funeral fund, 1505
Brookside Ave., Indianapolis,
IN 46201.
Hertha Deloris (Bledsoe) Johnson,
79, died Aug.15,
2011. She was born June 25,
1932 in Hector, Ark. to the late
Ira J. and Florence (Stanley)
Bledsoe. She owned Gary’s
Place, located at Thompson
Rd. and Madison Ave. She
was preceded in death by
her husband, Orville Johnson;
and one brother, Rick
Darriel Bledsoe. Survivors
include one son, Terron S.
Johnson, Sr.; two brothers,
Gary V. and Cary S. (Brenda)
Bledsoe; three grandchildren,
Casey, TJ and Paul
Johnson; and several nieces
and nephews. A Celebration
of Life was held Aug. 28 at
Fountain Square Mortuary.
James S. Keown,
58, Indianapolis, died Aug. 27, 2011.
He was born on Feb. 17, 1953
in Clinton to the late Harold
Keown and Mary Keown. Survivors
include his wife, Linda
Keown; his mother, Mary
Keown; six children, Melissa
(Timothy Sr.) Fry, Harold
(Colleena Tapscott) Keown,
James Keown, Eli Keown,
Tiffany Keown and Brittany
Keown; nine grandchildren,
Catherine Fry, Timothy Fry Jr.,
Natalie Fry, Calyssa Keown,
Caliey Keown, Cathleen Keown,
Arial Keown, Gabriel Keown
and Gage Keown; two
sisters, Beverly Jeffcoat and
Connie Swartz; and three
brothers David Keown, Richard
Keown and Kenny Keown.
Visitation will be Sept.
3 from noon to 4 p.m. at GH
Herrmann Funeral Home,
1505 S. East St. Funeral services
immediately follow.
Carl Allen Murphy,
54, died Aug. 23, 2011. He was born
Oct. 11, 1956 in Indianapolis
to Carl and June (Reece)
Murphy, Jr. He was employed
by Murphy Windows and
Doors. Other survivors include
two daughters, Jewell
R. and Vanessa N. Murphy;
one brother, Nick (Caryl)
Murphy; grandchildren, Alex,
Elieya and Christopher; and
former wife, Emma «Jeanie
(Capps) Murphy. A Celebration
of Life was held at
Fountain Square Mortuary
on Aug. 26, 2011.
Raymond Brian Streit,
61, Indianapolis, died Aug. 27,
2011. He was born on Nov.
22, 1949 in Binghamton, NY
to the late Norbert and Olga
Streit. Survivors include his
wife, JoEllen Streit; son, Chris
(Esther) Streit; grandchildren,
Wyatt and Sasha Streit;
and one sister, Frances (David)
Garofalo. Visitation will
be Sept. 1 from 1 to 1:30 p.m.
at GH Herrmann Funeral
Home, 1505 S. East St. Services
immediately follow with
burial at Calvary Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Salvation
Army or Morris Street United
Methodist Church.
Dietra York,
64, Beech Grove,
died Aug. 25, 2011. She was
born in Indianapolis to the
late Lester and Mary Helen
Adams. Survivors include
two children, Mark (Tina) De
Witt and Randy Jean (Tom)
Klene; grandsons, Paul
Thomas DeWitt, Bobby and
Tony Klene; sisters, Stephanie
Baker and Mary Helen
Adams, Jr.; brothers, George
Andrew and Joel Matthew
Adams. She was preceded
in death by her husband,
Randall York and a brother,
James Bruce Adams. A memorial
gathering was held
for Aug. 28, at Little & Sons
Funeral Home Beech Grove
Chapel, with a service at 6
p.m. Contributions may be
made to Holy Name Catholic
School, 89 N. 17th Ave.,
Beech Grove, In. 46107.

The end of summer, the beginning of fall

August 31, 2011 in Outdoors by Carol Michel

As dawn comes later each morning and dusk comes earlier, I feel the rush of time passing through the garden.
Whirring cicadas is another reminder, in case I don’t see it in the light.
Summer is ending. Fall is coming. For many people, these changes signal them to put away whatever gardening tools they have, get out the leaf rake and wait for leaves to fall. But fall is no time for standing around waiting.
Fall is for planting. September and October are great months for planting trees and shrubs. With a few exceptions,
trees and shrubs really do get off to a better start when planted in the fall, when their energy is naturally channeled toward establishing strong roots, not growing leaves and producing flowers and seeds. Be sure to water well anything newly planted and continue to water throughout the fall if we don’t get rain.
Fall is for watering. Our trees and shrubs have endured the second dry summer in a row. They should be watered
deeply several times between now and whenever the first hard freeze takes place to give them extra moisture going
into winter. This is especially true for evergreens that retain their needles or leaves through the winter.
Fall is for preparing new garden beds and borders. Preparing planting beds now will ensure they are ready to plant in the spring. I like to do this the easy way by putting plain brown cardboard or several layers of newspaper over the grass, then piling on leaves, compost, and top soil. By spring, the earth worms and soil microorganisms will have broken down the organic matter, leaving the bed ready to plant.
Fall is for planting bulbs for spring flowers. Garden centers will soon have tulip, daffodil, crocus and other spring flowering bulbs for sale. Buy them now while there is a good selection, then store the bulbs in a cool, dry location until late October when they can be planted and watered.
Fall is definitely not a time for standing around in the garden. Don’t even consider doing so. There is still a lot of gardening left to do, and this is the season to do it.

Summer's final cookout

August 31, 2011 in Health by Wendell Fowler

The first Monday in September is devoted to the social and economic triumphs of American workers; a national tribute to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our great country.
We traditionally celebrate this holiday by grilling various cuts of assorted barn animals, ripping up platters of Aunt Naomi’s fried chicken along with deli-cold cuts, macaroni or potato salad, deviled eggs, and buttered ears of corn; undeniably tasty, but hard-core building material for your expanding waistline.
This year, plan ahead. Have a healthy snack before going to any social soiree. When you’re not so hungry, you’ll be more likely to make healthier diet choices. Have some hummus and carrot sticks, a McDonald’s Fruit and Yogurt parfait, a fruit smoothie, a slice of turkey wrapped around a sweet pickle spear, peanut butter and apple or celery, one ounce of walnuts, pistachios, or almonds, a handful of edamame, baked potato chips, and well, you see where I’m going. Don’t skip your morning meal. You may think you’re saving calories but in reality, since you’re famished, you’re setting yourself up to overeat. Snort!
Eat less: Remember there’s a famine in Africa while we have TV shows that glorify gluttony. We are eating so much that 66% of us are obese. The super-sized marketing of American portions is largely responsible for soaring obesity rates. Less is more, although plump Americans decline to see it that way.
BYO: Politely offer to bring a healthy dish to the shindig. If you fill up with healthy foods, you’re less likely to pigout on less healthy foods. How about preparing a colorful platter of fresh chopped vegetables, Greek olives, and chunks of water-packed tuna, cubes of mozzarella or provolone, and pepperoncini’s, all marinated in your favorite Italian dressing.
Expand your horizons. My friend Bill takes Labor Day grilling seriously. His outdoor grill resembles the control console on Starship Enterprise. Since his brush with heart disease, he has transcended the Midwest’s die-hard meat and potato mindset and is quite proficient at grilling gorgeous, tasty vegetable and fruit kebabs. If you eat more sun-drenched fruits and veggies along with slabs-o-meat, then you create balance and harmony within your temple.
Take this opportunity to be a good role model. You’re not the only one who keeps tabs on what you eat. Your kids also are eyeing your food choices. Set a good example by practicing what you preach.
Participate in physical activities like swinging, softball or frisbee. Boredom combined with sitting close to the buffet table can be a seductive force. The last long weekend of summer should be celebrated, not liquor-drenched. Besides having a designated driver, also assign a Designated Grill Master to oversee food production. You’ll appreciate this more after you’ve suffered through a cookout where the chef got so hammered they lost their sense social propriety and time, and a picnic lunch turned into dinner. Too much broth spoils the cook, if you smell what I’m cookin’.

Home school Wildcats no longer underdogs

August 31, 2011 in Community by Jennifer Pherigo

Members of the Wildcats Indianapolis Homeschool basketball team enjoy the close-knit, athletic atmosphere, said Paul Settle, a Wildcats point guard and a junior in the homeschool program.
“We get guys from different parts of Indiana,” Settle said. “They really care and it’s not just an extracurricular activity to them.”
Before deciding 11 years ago to coach the Wildcats, Bialek
was Perry Meridian High School’s basketball coach.
“One of the most amazing differences between public school versus private school coaching is parent involvement,”
he said.
“I’ve never been on a team where the parents will suspend their kid for a week or more if their grades are not acceptable,” Bialek said.
With a basketball team consisting
of 45 players, ranging from 4th to 12th grade, Bialek notes that another difference between public and private school coaching is the lack of a permanent place for practices.
For the past four years, the Wildcats have used the gym at The Gathering Place at the Community Church of Greenwood.
Lack of a home base for athletes can be disheartening. But there’s also a positive side to the situation.
“Because our team is not a part of the Indiana High School Athletic Association, I love that I can work on a more individual basis that I wouldn’t be able to otherwise,” Bialek said.
Three days weekly, players attend morning practices. This schedule, in place since summer, will continue until the season starts in October.
On those days when the team has nowhere to dribble, their coach expects them to do conditioning exercises at home. Since 1994, the Indianapolis Homeschool Wildcats team has lost to state champs during the Indiana Christian Basketball Association’s annual tournament.
Under Bialek’s guidance, strict focus, strategy and skill building techniques, team members stand for good sportsmanship and hope to change the misconception about a homeschooled team.
Last year, during the tournament, the Wildcats launched those goals with a 46-42 victory against the Northwest Warriors. After participating in the tournament three years in a row and then winning last season,
their coach sees a definite turning point in the team.
“It’s not about winning state titles. It’s about playing the right way,” Bialek said. “Players
are taught that winning or losing should not change their character and that winning is only the reward for the hard work achieved.”
At the beginning of each new basketball season, a number of public and private schools scratch game schedules
for unknown reasons. But the Wildcats don’t allow this to get them down. Instead, players
work even harder to prove their worth.
Fundraisers and community sponsors help the Wildcats stay in the game. Their biggest fundraiser is a Free-Throw-A-Thon, set for the first Saturday of the season. While making 100 shots at the basket, playersraise money through donations.
Registration to join the Wildcats team begins in late August. Homeschooled children in grades 4-12 will compete for Varsity, Junior Varsity, Junior High and the Junior Cats depending on age groups. Those who excel in tryouts may place in one group above their age level. Information: homeschoolwildcats.com.

What's it worth? 9/1/2011

August 31, 2011 in What's It Worth? by Larry D. Cruse - Weichert, Realtors®- Tralee Properties

Type of Property: Family-Style Restaurant includes all business equipment along with a two-bedroom apartment.
Age: The building was established in 1920 and renovated in 2000.
Location: Southeast of Indianapolis in St. Paul, Indiana.
Square Footage: Total square footage is 3,360 SF.
Rooms: The two bedroom apartment also includes a living room, kitchen and laundry facilities. The restaurant has a seating capacity for approximately 30 people with additional space at the counter. There is also a cooking area along with a prep area and plenty of storage space throughout.
Strengths: This property is a profitable business and could also provide an apartment rental to generate additional income. The café is a small town, family style restaurant catering to customers from Indianapolis, Shelbyville and Greensburg. The friendly environment is most recognizable by the collection of personally identified coffee mugs that hang over the counter and are used by the patrons on their regular visits.
My opinion: $79,000

Back to school on a budget: It can be done with some savvy shopping

August 31, 2011 in Personal Finance by Sarah Woodruff

Right on time, Beech Grove’s new roundabout opens today. Located at a five-leg intersection, the $900,000 construction and inspection costs for the project will be paid by a Federal Highway Administration grant administered by the Metropolitan Planning Organization.
According to Beech Grove spokesman Joey Fox, the City of Beech Grove was initially asked to contribute
20 percent of the cost in order to match federal dollars, but there were no funds. So the MPO approved full funding for the project.
Following the City of Carmel’s lead, in an effort to slow traffic with the addition of roundabouts, intersections involving 17th Avenue, Albany Street and Churchman Avenue will now be much safer areas for drivers and pedestrians. Studies conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety find that a roundabout at busy intersections reduces fatalities by 90 percent and also saves drivers’ fuel by reducing idle time waiting at traffic lights.

Main Street matters

August 31, 2011 in Letters to the Editor by Submission For The Southside Times

Dear Editor,
Have you been to Main Street in Beech Grove lately? If you have, it surely breaks your heart. Crumbling roads and alleys, buckling sidewalks, weeds growing in sidewalk cracks, inadequate storm drainage and sandbags
have become commonplace. In 2005, the City of Beech Grove introduced a Redevelopment Commission (RDC) that was to focus on making improvements to our business districts to promote city growth. In 2006, the City and RDC rolled out an animated display of what Main Street will look like once redevelopment begins; 2007 passed without construction; 2008 came with hopes that reconstruction would begin; 2009 came with guarded optimism that Main Street will finally be redone. Once again, 2010 came around with assurances of Main Street reconstruction. Now here we are in August of 2011 with Main Street looking even more barren and deteriorated than it did pre-RDC. The city has been awarded a grant of approximately 4.6 million dollars to complete the Main Street project, with a match of 1.4 million, which is the city’s responsibility. The city had available funds to complete this project in 2008, 2009 and 2010 and didn’t, so I ask, WHERE IS THE MONEY? Now here we sit waiting on a litigation settlement as a result of a lawsuit against Amtrak to begin to reconstruct Main Street. Why should local business continue to suffer because of the city’s inability to effectively manage dollars that were generated specifically for the purpose of investing back into the retail corridor of our city?
Dennis B. Buckley
Retired Fire Chief, Candidate for Mayor

Top ten things a 92 year-old man has to live for

August 31, 2011 in Torry's Top Ten by Torry Stiles

10. New movies on The Movie Channel.
9. The opportunity to test those life insurance ads that claim, “you cannot be turned down.”
8. Tomorrow morning’s fresh doughnuts from Long’s.
7. Cher’s next face lift.
6. Next week’s Top Ten list.
5. Steak ‘n’ Shake’s Happy Hour.
4. Doobie Brothers’ next farewell tour.
3. The possibility of calling Customer Service and having a human being answer the phone.
2. Another exciting weekend at Indy’s Moto GP.
1. The chance to outlive everyone who has ever called him “Kid.”
(Note to all: All manner of events and people in my life have inspired these lists. I owe this week’s list to Victor, one of my regular readers, who I’ve never met.)

Dairy Queen ain’t what it used to be

August 31, 2011 in Opinion by Mike Redmond

I am a great admirer of Warren Buffett, and not just because he’s rich as Croesus and thinks he ought to pay more taxes (although I don’t notice him writing a huge check to the Treasury Department and saying, “Keep the change.”).
No, I admire Warren Buffett because Warren Buffett founded Berkshire Hathaway, and Berkshire Hathaway owns Dairy Queen.
Dairy Queen has been much on my mind lately for a few sort-of-but-not-really-connected reasons.
The first reason is I stopped at the Dairy Queen closest to my house the other day and got a Dilly Bar that was way below standard.
The second reason is that I’ve been goofing around on a Facebook page for people from LaGrangeCounty, and the Dairy Queen of our collective kidhood figures large in some of the conversation.
Third, I’ve always wanted to mention the Dairy Queen I like best, near the Fountain Square neighborhood of Indianapolis, which is one of those great old walk-up DQs.
That’s what the LaGrange DQ was when I first became aware of it. You stood on the sidewalk, ordered your cone and wandered over to the post office steps to sit down and enjoy it. This is such a terrific memory for me that I still think the walk-up Dairy Queen is vastly superior to the kind with tables and a burger grill.
Talk of the Dairy Queen in LaGrange invariably turned to, “What was your favorite DQ treat?” My first answer was Ellie Woodworth, one of four Woodworth sisters who worked there. Hubba hubba. My second was the dipped cone. Also hubba hubba.
Our DQ was famous for the tight ship run by its owner, Mrs. Lemings – a dear woman who insisted on doing things the right way. Before every shift, for example, employees had to line up and present their hands for inspectionby Mrs. Lemings. More than one of them got sent to the washroom for a do-over. Hospitals had nothing on Mrs. Lemings’ DQ for cleanliness.
Doing things the right way gets me to Ellie’s older sister, Barb. Now, as we all know, the signature of the DQ frozen treat is the curl on top. Without that, it’s just ice cream. Well, Barb was the best DQ curl maker in the Seventh Federal Reserve District. No matter what she was making, from a baby cone to a banana split, the curls were perfect every time.
For this reason, Barb was appointed the official Dilly Bar maker for the LaGrange DQ. You could always count on a Barb Woodworth Dilly Bar to have that perfect curl on the front side.
Of course, a Dilly Bar fan then had to make a decision: Do I start eating from the top, as is customary with an Eskimo-Pie style ice cream treat on a stick? Or do I first bite off the curl?
For me, it was a no-brainer. That curl was perfect and therefore irresistible. Besides, I heard once of a kid who bit off the curl and sucked out all the ice cream, leaving behind a perfect chocolate shell. It seemed like something I might like to do someday.
Which gets me to my substandard Dilly Bar other day.
It had no curl. It was just a flat disc. Just ice cream.
Where’s Barb Woodworth when you need her? Mrs. Lemings would not have let that one out of the shop.
I’d better write Warren Buffett. I think the boss should know about this. And pay a reward.

I am a great admirer of WarrenBuffett, and not just because he’s rich as Croesusand thinks he ought to pay more taxes (although I don’t notice him writing a huge check to the Treasury Department and saying, “Keep the change.”).No, I admire Warren Buffett because Warren Buffett founded Berkshire Hathaway, and BerkshireHathaway owns Dairy Queen.Dairy Queen has been much on my mind lately for a few sort-of-but-not-really-connected reasons.The first reason is I stopped at the Dairy Queen closest to my house the other day and got a Dilly Bar that was way below standard.The second reason is that I’ve been goofing around on a Facebookpage for people from LaGrangeCounty, and the Dairy Queen of our collective kidhood figures large in some of the conversation.Third, I’ve always wanted to mention the Dairy Queen I like best, near the Fountain Square neighborhood of Indianapolis, which is one of those great old walk-up DQs.That’s what the LaGrange DQ was when I first became aware of it. You stood on the sidewalk, ordered your cone and wandered over to the post office steps to sit down and enjoy it. This is such a terrific memory for me that I still think the walk-up Dairy Queen is vastly superior to the kind with tables and a burger grill.Talk of the Dairy Queen in LaGrange invariably turned to, “What was your favorite DQ treat?” My first answer was Ellie Woodworth, one of four Woodworthsisters who worked there. Hubba hubba. My second was the dipped cone. Also hubba hubba.Our DQ was famous for the tight ship run by its owner, Mrs. Lemings – a dear woman who insisted on doing things the right way. Before every shift, for example,employees had to line up and present their hands for inspectionby Mrs. Lemings. More than one of them got sent to the washroom for a do-over. Hospitalshad nothing on Mrs. Lemings’DQ for cleanliness.Doing things the right way gets me to Ellie’s older sister, Barb. Now, as we all know, the signature of the DQ frozen treat is the curl on top. Without that, it’s just ice cream. Well, Barb was the best DQ curl maker in the Seventh Federal Reserve District. No matter what she was making, from a baby cone to a banana split, the curls were perfect every time.For this reason, Barb was appointedthe official Dilly Bar maker for the LaGrange DQ. You could always count on a Barb Woodworth Dilly Bar to have that perfect curl on the front side.Of course, a Dilly Bar fan then had to make a decision: Do I start eating from the top, as is customarywith an Eskimo-Pie style ice cream treat on a stick? Or do I first bite off the curl?For me, it was a no-brainer. That curl was perfect and thereforeirresistible. Besides, I heard once of a kid who bit off the curl and sucked out all the ice cream, leaving behind a perfect chocolateshell. It seemed like somethingI might like to do someday.Which gets me to my substandardDilly Bar other day.It had no curl. It was just a flat disc. Just ice cream.Where’s Barb Woodworth when you need her? Mrs. Lemingswould not have let that one out of the shop.I’d better write Warren Buffett.I think the boss should know about this. And pay a reward.

Where do celebs’ gimmicky costumes go from here?

August 31, 2011 in Opinion by Kevin Kane

If last weekend’s MTV Video Music Awards taught us anything, it’s that no getup is too ridiculous these days if it gets you noticed.
In the past few years we’ve seen a significant increase in crazy costumes worn by aspiring superstars. Lady Gaga perhaps should be credited with getting this trend off the ground. It’s difficult – if not impossible – to find her in what would be considered normal clothing. That’s because she doesn’t wear Versace on the red carpet; she wears dresses made of meat, coats of puppet frogs and an assortment of costumes that cover her face mostly or sometimes completely.
“Freak show” is what comes to mind when I see her fashion choices – but “career advancement” probably is more accurate. There seems to be a method to this costume madness: Wear strange costumes so the public notices you. Media and event guests aren’t thinking “Look, there goes Beyoncé and Rihanna.” They’re wondering “How did that mental patient wrapped in bubbles get in here?”
At last weekend’s VMAs, Gaga’s attire was fairly tame compared to her competition in the “I must be the center of attention” category. Kreayshawn wore a multicolored Mickey Mouse and hairstyle that changed colors as abruptly and dramatically as a wall featuring various paint samples.
Her pink hair apparently not different enough, Katy Perry put a yellow cube on top of her head before accepting the Video of the Year Award. But Nicki Minaj decided she’d go home with the “worst dressed” award. The rapper seemingly got dressed using items from a child’s toy chest exclusively, wearing an ice cream cone necklace, non-matching kids’ slippers with one shaped like a dragon and carrying a stuffed…well, something. These were in addition to her cotton candy-style hair and polka dot mask covering her mouth.
These gimmicks achieved what was intended; we’re still talking about ridiculous costumes. There’s no reason to expect
this trend to stop or even slow down, but where do we go from here?
Gaga seemed to know this year’s VMAs would feature copycat costumes. She went a different route to remain different,
dressing up as a man. If other celebrity women don’t follow suit and wear suits to awards shows, what will next year’s VMAs look like? It’s hard to believe there’s an eye-catching option that hasn’t been tried. What’s left for outrageously
dressing celebs to wear? A costume resembling a porcelain vase? That’s been done. All-leather outfits covering
one’s face? Cross that off the list. How about hairdos featuring geometrical shapes? Done to death.
Limitations are set only by these celebs’ desperation for attention. Considering that, it may not be too unreasonable to expect full-body Chewbacca costumes or something featurin Quatto from Total Recall.
How attention-hungry celebrities continue to try to top each other remains to be seen, but if last weekend’s VMA is any indicator, future award shows will be more costume than cocktail parties.